Admissions

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The Humane Society of Utah works with our community to find the best possible solution and outcome for both you and your pet.

 

Do you need help with your pet? There are alternatives to rehoming. Please review the following resources before rehoming your pet.

Our Admissions Department is open Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Please view our Holiday Hours page.

Pet admissions are handled by appointment only through our Coordinated Entry System (read Pet Rehoming FAQs below.) By scheduling an appointment, you will be able to sit down with an Admissions Placement Coordinator to discuss your situation and gather essential information about your pet. Please read the following before making an appointment.

HSU is Utah's largest private open-admission shelter, meaning that our doors are always open to any animal that we can legally accept. An “owned” animal is an animal for which a person can provide proof of ownership through bill of sale, purchase/adoption contract, veterinary records, license and microchip. We cannot legally accept stray animals or animals found at large, which are the responsibility of your municipal animal shelter and should be taken to the local animal control services for the area where the animal was found. HSU does not accept healthy feral or friendly stray cats for intake and recommends local Community Cat Programs. Read Pet Rehoming FAQs below for additional information.

Please note, we are not suited to accommodate pets such as reptiles, fish or exotic animals, and we encourage you to contact a rescue group that specializes in these species. Please contact your local animal control services or a rescue group specializing in your animal if you have a question. 

STEP 1. Why are you considering rehoming your pet?

1. Why are you considering rehoming your pet?

Rehoming your pet should be smooth and stress-free for you and your pet. The Petco Foundation has created a simple, reliable, free program to help you place your pet from your home directly to another. Click HERE for more information.

Read our Kitten Season Reminders before surrendering a litter of found kittens. Read about TNR and Community Cat Programs HERE.

Want to find out more about available options? Click HERE to schedule a call Sunday through Thursday. One of our Admissions Counselors will call you between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. for a 15-minute consultation to discuss alternatives and resources available.

 

Schedule A Call

STEP 2. If you have decided to rehome your pet through HSU

2. If you have decided to rehome your pet through HSU, click to schedule an appointment and complete the required profile. 

One pet surrendered per appointment or one litter of puppies/kittens/rabbits per appointment. Appointments can be scheduled 24 hours in advance Monday - Thursday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., or Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Understand that placing your pet in a shelter will be stressful and difficult for them, and should be the last resort. If you would like to discuss alternatives to pet surrender, please schedule a call first.

We understand that rehoming your pet is a difficult decision and during your appointment, we will work with you to ensure the best possible solution for you and your pet. By scheduling an appointment, you will be able to sit down with an Admissions Placement Coordinator to discuss your situation and gather essential information about your pet.

HSU helps over 11,000 dogs, cats, rabbits, and other small pets in need of finding new loving homes each year. We are members of the No Kill Utah (NKUT) Coalition, and last year, over 90 percent of the animals in our care were placed in homes, reunited with owners, or released to other trusted animal welfare organizations. Our commitment is to find placement for every healthy and treatable pet in our care. A health examination, behavior assessment, and history review will determine if your pet is suited for our adoption program. A fee is requested when you relinquish your pet to offset the cost of this evaluation and rehoming process.

A custodial surrender refers to an animal that is surrendered to the Humane Society of Utah by someone who has been given guardianship or permission by the legal owner. Custodial surrenders may occur if the owner has become incapacitated and cannot surrender their pet in person. A signed letter from the owner transferring ownership to HSU and granting the person bringing the animal permission to surrender the animal on their behalf is required. Please bring proof of ownership and contact information for the legal owner.

* Please bring all housing equipment with your bird.

STEP 3. What should you expect after scheduling an appointment?

3. What should you expect after scheduling an appointment? 

You will receive a confirmation email after scheduling an appointment and can cancel or reschedule if needed. You will also receive a reminder email 24 hours before your appointment.

Please read the Pet Rehoming FAQs below or contact us at admissions@utahhumane.org with any questions before arriving. 

What to bring to your appointment:

  1. A driver's license or other government-issued ID.

  2. Proof of ownership - through bill of sale, purchase/adoption contract, veterinary records, license, microchip.

  3. Your pet’s up-to-date veterinary records.

  4. Your pet's rehoming fee, listed below.

 

* All services and pricing are subject to change without notice. Hours may vary on holidays.

Pet Rehoming FAQs

What is Coordinated Entry?

Coordinated entry is a process to ensure that people with pets who are experiencing a resource or housing crisis are quickly identified, assessed, referred, and connected to available resources.

The Humane Society of Utah is excited to announce that we have launched a Coordinated Entry System (CES) as the next step to saving more lives. The Coordinated Entry System was developed through models in animal welfare known as managed admissions programs and through the body of work of human services agencies to help people facing a housing crisis. In launching our CES, we will work to streamline and connect our community with holistic resources to better serve their individual needs. CES streamlines the process of finding resources and housing for animals facing homelessness with the goal of housing the most vulnerable animals first and helping families keep their pets whenever possible. Please watch this informative video from Animal Humane New Mexico that explains more: 

 

What to bring to your pet surrender appointment:

  1. A driver's license or other government-issued ID.

  2. Proof of ownership - through bill of sale, purchase/adoption contract, veterinary records, license, microchip.

  3. Your pet’s up-to-date veterinary records.

  4. Your pet's surrender fee, listed below. The cost to care for and rehome pets can be hundreds of dollars or more for each animal. As a local private nonprofit organization, we ask for a fee to help subsidize this cost. The fee is non-refundable and is not dependent on the outcome you choose for your pet after its evaluation.

 

What to expect at your appointment:

Your appointment will take approximately 30-45 minutes and will include a health exam and behavior evaluation of your pet. After we've gathered information about your pet and the animal exam and assessment are completed, we'll discuss your options with you so you can make the best decision for your pet.

Please note that the Humane Society of Utah is an open-admission shelter that welcomes any animal that we can legally accept. As a member of the No Kill Utah (NKUT) Coalition, our goal is to eliminate euthanasia of healthy and treatable pets. We are working with other animal welfare organizations both statewide and nationally to achieve this goal. However, we cannot guarantee that any animal will be adopted. Animals that have untreatable or unmanageable medical or behavior conditions may be euthanized out of concern for the animal's quality of life and/or out of concern for the safety of the community in cases where the animal exhibits dangerous behavior.

 

Why do I need to make an appointment to bring in a pet?

To ensure resources are ready and available when a pet arrives, the Humane Society of Utah requires a scheduled appointment. Without an appointment process, we would have no control over the number of pets that come into our care each day, and our ability to provide the best possible care for each animal would be hindered. It also eliminates you having to wait in long lines with your pet.

 

What if I don't want to make an appointment?

If you don't want to schedule an appointment, we will refer you to other rescues and shelters or provide rehoming information to help you rehome your pet yourself.

 

What types of pets does HSU accept?

We provide services for cats, dogs, rabbits, domestic rodents (rats, mice, gerbils, hamsters, chinchillas), ferrets, and small birds. We do not accept wildlife, exotic pets (such as reptiles, large birds like cockatoos and amazons) or livestock (such as chickens, pigs, and goats). If you have an exotic pet or livestock, we can refer you to a rescue or other resource that might be able to help. Please contact the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (801) 538-4700 for assistance with wildlife. In the case of skunks, raccoons, and coyotes, contact the Utah Department of Agriculture at (801) 538-7100.

We cannot accept any animal that has bitten a person within the last ten days. By law, such an animal must be taken to your local animal control facility.

 

Does HSU accept strays?

No, your municipal animal services are legally responsible for stray animals. An “owned” animal is an animal for which a person can provide proof of ownership (through vet records, license and microchip, etc.). A "stray" means any animal found at large. By taking the stray animal to your local animal control services, it will have a better chance of being reunited with its family who may be searching for them in their local area. Click to view the Wasatch Front Animal Control List to find your local animal control services.

We also cannot accept wildlife or livestock. Contact the Department of Wildlife Resources for issues concerning wildlife.

HSU does not accept healthy feral or friendly stray cats for intake and recommends local Community Cat Programs. Read about TNR and Community Cat Programs HERE.

 

Can I find out what happens to my pet after it's surrendered to HSU?

Yes. If you contact HSU, we'll let you know if your pet was adopted or placed with a rescue partner. However, we will not share adopter contact information or details about the rescue partner to which your pet was transferred.

Last year, more than 90 percent of the animals in our care were placed in homes, reunited with owners, or released to other animal welfare organizations. HSU has not euthanized a healthy dog or cat for any reason since 2015, and there is no time limit for animals in our care. If we determine your pet cannot become healthy or suitable for placement, the decision for humane euthanasia may be made.

 

What if my pet has bitten a person in the last 10 days?

If your pet has bitten a person breaking the skin and drawing blood within the last 10 days, by law, you must notify your local animal control services. If you are returning a pet that has been adopted through HSU within the past 30 days, we can accept the animal.

 

Salt Lake County Animal Services

Per an arrangement with the HSU and Salt Lake County Animal Services (SLCoAS), any animals surrendered to us by residents living within the jurisdiction of SLCoAS who were previously adopted from SLCoAS will be returned to SLCoAS.

Pet Rehoming Fees

The cost to care for and rehome pets can be hundreds of dollars or more for each animal. Upon intake, every animal is vaccinated, spayed or neutered if not already done, and microchipped. As a local private nonprofit organization, we ask for a surrender fee to help subsidize this cost. The fee is non-refundable and is not dependent on the outcome you choose for your pet after its evaluation.

Dog or Puppy

$60/$85 for litters of two or more

Cat or Kitten

$60/$85 for litters of two or more

Rabbit/Small Mammal

$30/$45 for litters of two or more

Bird

$30

 

* All services and pricing are subject to change without notice. Hours may vary on holidays.

End-of-Life Euthanasia

The Humane Society of Utah provides euthanasia services for pet owners at a reduced cost. Please note that pet owners cannot be in the room with their pet as this service is provided, but rest assured that our highly-trained and compassionate Animal Care Team will offer the most humane service possible. We only euthanize by injection (EBI) of sodium pentobarbital.

This service is available Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

If you would prefer to be with your animal during the euthanasia process, please review the Other Services section on our Clinic page for information and pricing.

 

Fees

Dog or cat $50.00
Rabbit or Small Mammal $30.00

 

Private Interment

We provide private cremation service for families who wish to keep the remains of their pet. Your pet will receive an individual cremation with its remains carefully packaged and returned to you in a standard container. The animal remains will be available for pick-up 7 to 10 business days after your pet is brought to our facility. Please speak with our staff for current pricing.

Public Interment

For those who do not wish to keep the remains of their pet, public interment services are included in the fee.

 

Schedule Euthanasia Appointment

 

* All services and pricing are subject to change without notice. Hours may vary on holidays.

Lost Pets Tips

If you've found a lost/stray animal.

You should report stray animals by phone to your nearest Animal Control agency (either your municipal or county shelter). If the dog or cat is friendly and approachable, you can try to contain the animal to determine if it has an identification tag on with a name, address or phone number of its owner. If no identification tag is present, you can transport the animal to your local animal control services to be scanned for a microchip and held to reunite with the owner.

HSU cannot legally take in stray pets and requires proof of ownership for surrendered pets. Since owners will be searching for their lost pet in their local area, taking a lost or stray animal to your local animal control services offers owners the best chance of finding their pet. 


If you've lost a pet. 

The Humane Society of Utah urges you to visit your local Animal Control services and local veterinary clinics in person since it may be difficult to find a pet based on a verbal description or photo.

Visit our Admissions Department in person during regular business hours if you do not locate your pet through Animal Control. 

We encourage you to view our Stray Listing Search linked to several other shelters.

Remember to keep checking with other shelters as the stray holding period depends on when the animal was received. Some individuals attempt to find owners on their own before bringing the animal to a shelter. You may also try the Facebook group Utah Lost and Found Pets. Read more tips at PawBoost and consider using My Lost Pet Alert services.

We strongly recommend having your pet microchipped and registered to you as a safe and permanent way to identify your animal. Remember to keep your contact information updated with your pet microchip registration company.

Find Your Local Animal Control Services

For a printable version of the Wasatch Front Animal Control List click here.

If you have lost your pet, we recommend that you check your shelter(s) at least every other day in person. You know your pet better than anyone else and will be able to identify your pet in person.